CBD Is Here to Chill Out Anxious Pets, Whether They Want It or Not

By Jay Benning

February 10, 2020
Categories: Pet
"
Read more

Jill Douglas, a 52-year-old gift-basket maker, first heard about CBD for pets when her friend’s cat’s tumor fell off. “He was [topically] putting CBD oil on his cat that had a tumor-like thing on his tail,” she said. “And it literally just fell off. It was amazing.”

She was inspired to try out CBD for her own cat, Klinger, whom she had diagnosed with a serious case of “cattitude.” “Within literally a week or so of taking the CBD, I was able to pet her,” she said. Klinger also lost weight, which Douglas also credits to CBD treatments.

CBD—the non-psychoactive derivative of the marijuana and hemp plants—has taken off among humans, marketed as a solution for everything from pain and anxiety to skin care and diet. So it should come as no surprise that pets—on whom Americans spend $72 billion annually—may reap the supposed benefits. CBD oil has made its way into pet treats and oils sprinkled carefully over the food bowl, making up nearly $7 million of the almost $6 billion in weed dispensary sales in California, Colorado, Oregon, and Washington last year. It’s marketed as a remedy for animal’s seizures, arthritis, pain, and anxiety.

 

Unlike most edibles, CBD pet treats are legal nearly everywhere, available online, in pet and hardware stores, Instagram ads, and everywhere else. Small businesses that sell them are cropping up across the country; Ashley Tisdale is shilling for one of them that sells full-spectrum hemp oil products. Pet empires also now carry them; BarkShop, the sister company to subscription service BarkBox, markets their new CBD dog treats to their subscribers via e-mail newsletters, at veterinarian-community conferences, and social-media feeds that are filled with pictures of adorably chilled-out dogs, as well as crash courses on what CBD is and how to use it for pets.

Greg Shoenfeld, the vice president of operations at the Boulder, Colorado-based cannabis market-research company BDS Analytics, noticed medicinal pet treats popping up in dispensary sales data starting in 2015. When Shoenfeld started seeing the treats everywhere else, too, he decided to pick some up for Bear, his Newfoundland-Labrador retriever mix.

 

Shoenfeld’s aim was never to get Bear high, and the science of the pet products means he actually can’t. Cannabis and hemp plants contain both tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and CBD, but only THC gets the consumer stoned.

His veterinarian had recommended the more traditional Rimadyl for Bear’s arthritis pain, but for Shoenfeld, CBD was the obvious holistic choice. Shoenfeld is most loyal to a Colorado-based brand called Pet.Releaf, which sells CBD and hemp “edibites”—fruit-flavored dog treats made with CBD from hemp grown in eastern Colorado—for $23.99 to $34.99 per standard bag, and oils that start at $28.99 per bottle and go up to $99.99. He says the treats worked so well for Bear that he now spends as much per month on CBD for his Lab mix—$100—as he does for food.

Written By

DISCLAIMER: These statements have not been evaluated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Verlota Inc. products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. Information contained in or made available through Verlota.com website is not intended to constitute or substitute legal advice or consultation from veterinary professionals. www.verlota.com/terms-and-conditions

0
Cart Icon Cart Icon